Marketing Webinar December 12

Next Saturday, December 12, 10 AM – 11:30 AM
LACP – Los Angeles Center Of Photography

  • Basic marketing principles: what applies to photographers – and what does not
  • Online and social media marketing
  • Marketing using paper
  • Being a brand means being yourself
  • Websites: what buyers want to see
  • How clients look for photographers
  • SEO is easier than you might think
  • How to: identify clients, find their contacts, and approach them after you do
  • Crucial importance of people skills
  • Everything is marketing: email formats, proposals, even clothes
  • Participants who request them will receive a folder of sample contracts and other documents

REGISTER HERE:
https://lacphoto.org/events/marketing-with-barry-schwartz-dec-2020/

Two Publications

Two articles this month in very different publications.

First, The New York Times, in their Travel Through The Lens series that was started after the pandemic made traveling safely not so easy for writers, photographers, reporters, or anyone else. I submitted images I had taken three years ago as a self-assignment. I had two fantastic editors, Phaedra Brown for the photos, and Stephen Hiltner for the essay. What a pleasure to work with them both – they made me look good (which of course is the job) something I learned a long time ago and have been grateful for ever since, since it’s always the writer and photographer who gets the credit. They even came up with the title.

Quiet Reflections on the Enchanting Italian Village of Panicale

And then there is Preservation Magazine, produced by the National Trust For Historic Preservation, who I have worked for in the past. In this case, Meghan Drueding, the Managing Editor, contacted me and licensed images I had produced on my own for San Francisco Heritage, whose mission is to preserve the best parts of the physical – and, I would argue, emotional and spiritual – aspects of San Francisco. I spent three days photographing their headquarters, the Haas-Lilienthal House, after they raised over $4 million to bring the building back to life.

A San Francisco Victorian House Provides a Portal to the Past